radiospringy

crackmccraigen:

Part 2 of “Toys that Never Were!” THE BLOO SUPERDUDE! 

Back when we were developing Foster’s toys I was in a meeting with our manufacturer to brainstorm ideas for what would make a great Bloo toy. After some frustrating back and fourth on the difficulty of making toys for comedy cartoons, I suggested that if Bloo was sitting in this meeting he would have no problem coming up with what would make a great toy of him…  

HE WOULD WANT THE MOST EXTREME TOY EVER MADE!!!

So I developed Bloo’s heroic fantasy version of himself: The Bloo Superdude! My thought was that you could make a toy for a comedy by making a comedic toy! I thought it would be funny to turn Bloo into one of the most absurdly stupid (but awesome) action figures ever! Just make him a pumped up warrior/robot/superhero/rock-star with tons of useless (but awesome) gadgets, weapons, and accessories! 

Each Superdude set would come with a basic removable Bloo figure (each with a different expression) and one of the members of the Foster’s gang.

So the Superdude would come with a Mac, his jetpack could come with an Eduardo, additional weapons for his robo-arm could include a Coco, and his chopper came with a bendy Wilt.

That way, if you collected all the sets you would not only have all this Superdude stuff, but you would also have the basic Foster’s gang as well!   

Cartoon Network and I loved this idea so much, that in an attempt to convince our manufacturer to make The Superdude, I made a couple of cartoons with him in it and CN made the amazing prototype pictured here.

Despite our best efforts, it didn’t happen. But at least CN was nice enough to let me have the prototype as proof of how absurdly stupid (but awesome) this toy could have been.

We could have had it all!

Genius at work here. 

That’s the problem with a lot of modern toys, I guess … they aren’t as fun as this looks. 

It’s a parody of an action figure, and I love it!

But alas, Cartoon Network and their infinite wisdom … 

Detentionaire FINALLY has an American home, and it’s Cartoon Network … ‘s Always On digital platform. 

What’s Always On?

Essentially it’s an online outlet that’s has Cartoon Network programming, including exclusive shows and shorts never before seen on Cartoon Network. In theory, it’s  Cartoon Network 2.0, 24/7/365. All day, all night. always on.

Details, including a launch date (some places are saying March 31, but I’m not 100% certain about that right now) to come shortly. In the meantime, here’s the official synopsis for the first batch of original shows that’s a part of Cartoon Network “Always On”:

  • Detentionaire: Framed for a major prank and punished with a full year of detention, high schooler Lee Ping sneaks out of detention to try to expose who was really behind the prank and avoid being caught by the school’s principal Barrage. After clearing his name, Lee again attempts to sneak out of Barrage’s upgraded detention room, discovering that a strange pyramid under the school has something to do with Lee’s key, the parents council and the blue tazwurms. There is more to the school than meets the eye! Created by animators Daniel Bryan Franklin & Charles Johnston,Detentionaire is distributed by Nelvana.
  • Angelo Rules (Season 2): For a kid, life can be a daily battle. There are adults, siblings, teachers and rivals telling them what to do, what not to do, what to say… Well, it’s time for kids to take control and Angelo’s here to show the way! He observes and then comes up with elaborate strategies to wheedle, sweet-talk, con, and work around any adversary. Season two of this new series comes from TeamTo and Cake Entertainment.
  • Rocket Jo: Rocket Jo is an inventor-adventurer: his unique goal is to get his jet-pack to function and send him flying in the air for good…without effect. But his valiant attempts are always a false dawn to viewers’ great delight, as there always are failures, gags, explosions, falls, etc. Produced by Millimages and 2D3D, Rocket Jo works hard, drawing upon all his imagination, to make viewers laugh, both children and parents.
Okay, so Stuart Snyder has been at the helm  of Cartoon Network for seven years marked with a lot of bumps and jolts and kept the network stagnant  ratings-wise for the most part.
So Snyder was at the helm when the live-action agenda went into full effect with disastrous results like the ill-fated CN Real that wanted to prove that Cartoon Network was “more than just cartoons” and the Hall of Game Awards, which hasn’t been fruitful nor beneficial to anybody nor the network as a whole.
So Snyder was at the helm of Cartoon Network that largely maligned and pushed serious action cartoons like Sym-Bionic Titan, ThunderCats, and Young Justice out of the way and pushed Toonami off the network altogether for about four years (it’s now on Saturday nights/Sunday mornings on Adult Swim, where it’s growing tremendously and largely outside of Snyder’s scope). 
So Snyder was at the helm of Cartoon Network when their competitors were growing and expanding beyond their core networks and creating new brands and channels while the lone CN spinoff channel in the US, Boomerang, was largely on autopilot until about December 2013. 
So Snyder was at the helm of Cartoon Network when Warner Bros Animation became more estranged from their corporate cousin by not telling them up front about lengthy hiatuses and premature cancellations. Oh, and allowing Thundercats, Generator Rex, Sym-Bionic Titan, Scooby-Doo: Mystery Inc, The Looney Tunes Show, Green Lantern, Young Justice, Batman: The Brave and the Bold, and Beware the Batman to have low-key, largely unadvertised end runs. 
So Snyder was behind the helm of Cartoon Network that brought some of the best new cartoons in an era (Adventure Time, Regular Show, Gumball, Uncle Grandpa, and Steven Universe) only to have them rerun to death in every open slot on the lineup.  Oh, and he pushed out great creators like Tartakovsky, McCracken, Faust, Rudish, Atoms, Greenblatt, Van Orman, and Hirsch. who felt at the time the network was moving in a direction where they weren’t wanted.
So Snyder was behind the helm of Cartoon Network that saw the network’s hours decrease 12 hours a week. 
After hearing that Snyder’s planning to leave Cartoon Network before the end of the month, I am curious what the network I love so much is going to do in his absence and if they’ll ever find their place in the world again and go to bigger heights. I’d love to see that happen. 
Just once I’d like to see a post-AOL-era Cartoon Network replacement boss better than the guy he replaces, not worse. 
So, au revoir Stuart Snyder. 
It’s been real.

Okay, so Stuart Snyder has been at the helm  of Cartoon Network for seven years marked with a lot of bumps and jolts and kept the network stagnant  ratings-wise for the most part.

So Snyder was at the helm when the live-action agenda went into full effect with disastrous results like the ill-fated CN Real that wanted to prove that Cartoon Network was “more than just cartoons” and the Hall of Game Awards, which hasn’t been fruitful nor beneficial to anybody nor the network as a whole.

So Snyder was at the helm of Cartoon Network that largely maligned and pushed serious action cartoons like Sym-Bionic Titan, ThunderCats, and Young Justice out of the way and pushed Toonami off the network altogether for about four years (it’s now on Saturday nights/Sunday mornings on Adult Swim, where it’s growing tremendously and largely outside of Snyder’s scope). 

So Snyder was at the helm of Cartoon Network when their competitors were growing and expanding beyond their core networks and creating new brands and channels while the lone CN spinoff channel in the US, Boomerang, was largely on autopilot until about December 2013. 

So Snyder was at the helm of Cartoon Network when Warner Bros Animation became more estranged from their corporate cousin by not telling them up front about lengthy hiatuses and premature cancellations. Oh, and allowing Thundercats, Generator Rex, Sym-Bionic Titan, Scooby-Doo: Mystery Inc, The Looney Tunes Show, Green Lantern, Young Justice, Batman: The Brave and the Bold, and Beware the Batman to have low-key, largely unadvertised end runs. 

So Snyder was behind the helm of Cartoon Network that brought some of the best new cartoons in an era (Adventure Time, Regular Show, Gumball, Uncle Grandpa, and Steven Universe) only to have them rerun to death in every open slot on the lineup.  Oh, and he pushed out great creators like Tartakovsky, McCracken, Faust, Rudish, Atoms, Greenblatt, Van Orman, and Hirsch. who felt at the time the network was moving in a direction where they weren’t wanted.

So Snyder was behind the helm of Cartoon Network that saw the network’s hours decrease 12 hours a week. 

After hearing that Snyder’s planning to leave Cartoon Network before the end of the month, I am curious what the network I love so much is going to do in his absence and if they’ll ever find their place in the world again and go to bigger heights. I’d love to see that happen. 

Just once I’d like to see a post-AOL-era Cartoon Network replacement boss better than the guy he replaces, not worse. 

So, au revoir Stuart Snyder. 

It’s been real.

fred-frederator-studios
fred-frederator-studios:

Services such as Netflix, YouTube and Hulu in the U.S. are now competing on equal footing with kids television networks — and they’re winning.
According to research compiled for our new TV Network Report, YouTube is the second-highest rated “network” in terms of Kidfinity — a proprietary measure of kids’ brand awareness, popularity and love for a brand — falling just behind Nickelodeon and surpassing Disney Channel. Meanwhile, Netflix is the second-fastest growing “network,” and ranks just two Kidfinity points behind Cartoon Network.
The impact of Netflix, YouTube and Hulu on U.S. kids’ viewing habits
By Melanie Shreffler, trends and insights guru at Smarty Pants market research firm
Stream Daily via KidscreenFebruary/March 2014

Dun dun dunnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn!
The new paradigm is happening as we speak. Now it’s crunch time for the Big Three. Can they remain relevant in the age of broadband. 
Will they fight, fall, or follow? Will they finally acknowledge that content is king? Or will they continue to ignore the world with fingers in their ears singing “La la la” while reruns of Spongebob, shows based on building blocks, and the teen flavor of the month continue to clog their airwaves? 
It’s almost upfront season. 
Game on. 

fred-frederator-studios:

Services such as Netflix, YouTube and Hulu in the U.S. are now competing on equal footing with kids television networks — and they’re winning.

According to research compiled for our new TV Network Report, YouTube is the second-highest rated “network” in terms of Kidfinity — a proprietary measure of kids’ brand awareness, popularity and love for a brand — falling just behind Nickelodeon and surpassing Disney Channel. Meanwhile, Netflix is the second-fastest growing “network,” and ranks just two Kidfinity points behind Cartoon Network.

The impact of Netflix, YouTube and Hulu on U.S. kids’ viewing habits

By Melanie Shreffler, trends and insights guru at Smarty Pants market research firm

Stream Daily via KidscreenFebruary/March 2014

Dun dun dunnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn!

The new paradigm is happening as we speak. Now it’s crunch time for the Big Three. Can they remain relevant in the age of broadband. 

Will they fight, fall, or follow? Will they finally acknowledge that content is king? Or will they continue to ignore the world with fingers in their ears singing “La la la” while reruns of Spongebob, shows based on building blocks, and the teen flavor of the month continue to clog their airwaves? 

It’s almost upfront season. 

Game on. 

curekakapo

stephendestefano:

SYM-BIONIC TITAN sketches for CN promotional use (not that CN ever promoted it or anything).
I can’t recall if Genndy started these or I drew them all on my lonesome.
That was a fun job, Titan.

Not that CN ever promoted it or anything. 

Not that CN ever promoted it or anything. 

Not that CN ever promoted it or anything. 

Loved how Toonami promoted the short-lived series when it was on the block. Man, I loved that show. 

Things I’ve Noticed #1

  • People are watching PBS dramas. Lots and lots of people are watching PBS dramas. And talking about them publicly.
  • American dramas are adapting the British television model, and that’s not a bad thing at all. 
  • The Weather Channel, which now has a prime-time lineup of reality shows, is now considered expendable and replaceable by a major cable/satellite operator.
  • Power Rangers is on Nickelodeon-owned outlets. Craig McCracken has a show on Disney Channel and Genndy Tarakovsky is making films at Sony.
  • There are more Warner Bros.-branded cartoons on Hub Network than Cartoon Network. 
  • Lots and lots of people absolutely love My Little Pony, and a whole lot of them are dudes. 
  • Hawaii Five-0 is on CBS again. And Dallas is heading towards its third season on TNT.
  • There are four broadcast (non-cable) shows (three dramas [Scandal, Elementary, and Sleepy Hollow] and one comedy [The Mindy Project]) with female POC leads.
  • There’s a Teen Wolf series on MTV that’s nothing like the movies it’s based on but is remarkably better in every way.
  • Also of note, there’s a show from the creator of You Can’t Do That on Television on The CW right now. 
  • Nickelodeon has largely gotten away with airing one show throughout 75% of its afternoon lineup. And USA has become Crime Marathon TV Network with wrestling on Monday nights.
  • The West Coast hates the East Coast Social Media scene. We spoil things. A lot.
  • Lots of people are looking at television shows, but not on television. It’s confusing to folks that don’t get it. 
  • AMC can stretch out a final season.
  • DC Comics is too selective when it comes to adapting their properties to any medium. They put Batman in EVERYTHING. Marvel Comics is too loose when it comes to adapting their properties to any medium. They put Iron Man in EVERYTHING.

Over 18,000 Reblogs/Likes Thanks, But A Bit of an Addendum

People read that article? People LIKED that article? 

That’s madness. Lot of folks did, and I thank you

A few didn’t, mostly because they felt the Malibu Stacy metaphor didn’t really fit the practices of Cartoon Network’s handling of the Powerpuff Girls special in light of the internet blowing up after hearing DC Animated Universe co-creator Paul Dini’s experiences with the network telling him the reason those shows get cancelled is because girls don’t buy things and they’re watching those action properties more than the intended young boys demographics who buy the toys.

Perhaps it isn’t the right metaphor, but it’s the only one that I could think of at that moment, but there are a few things to point out:

  • I did acknowledge that Cartoon Network announced that Powerpuff Girls special earlier in the year. Like, WAY earlier in the year, on January 28, 2013. The initial press release stated that it would come on later in the year, as in later in 2013, not 2014. And it was complete when they initially announced it. It took about a year to make, from script to finished special. There are rumors that it took five years to make, which is untrue. If it did take that long, Craig MacCracken would have had involvement on the special since he was still at Cartoon Network, and he’s not involved here at all.  
  • Cartoon Network usually doesn’t work on social media on Sundays, mostly because there’s no news on a Sunday. They barely work on Saturdays on social media as well, but when the fans complain, they’d usually send a tweet or something way later in the day to address anything. Like this gem from October 13, 2012. I’m not saying that they weren’t going to start to finally place the PPG special before the reaction to the Paul Dini interview hit the internet, but you do have to wonder if that was the case.
  • Certainly they wouldn’t be plugging something that’ll come on a month after the PPG special would air, would they? That wouldn’t make much sense. 

There were a few dates that Cartoon Network could have scheduled the special.

  1. Labor Day could have been a great day for an end-of-the-summer present for the viewers. Yes, they had Uncle Grandpa premiere that night, but imagine the ratings that would have been if a one-time PPG special aired before Uncle Grandpa's premiere. And don't say they don't air dual premieres on one day. On Labor Day 2010, Regular Show and MAD debuted. Labor Day 2011 had multiple premieres, highlighted by Adventure Time with Fionna and Cake. 2009 had a Ben 10 marathon while 2008 had a Pokemon marathon. Labor Day tends to be one of those end-of-summer event days, and they tend to have a marathon topped off by a premiere by the end of the night.
  2. Another day that could premiered the Powerpuff Girls special was the day before Thanksgiving. In 2011, they premiered Journey to the Center of the Earth, Level Up, and a new episode of Adventure Time. In 2010, they premiered the Speed Racer live-action movie followed by FireBreather, which was one of the highest-rated debuts in network history. In 2009, they aired the  second live-action Ben 10 movie, Alien Swarm. Two years earlier, they aired the first live-action Ben 10 movie, Race Against Time. In 2006, they aired the first Men in Black movie the day before Thanksgiving and the Foster’s special Good Wilt Hunting on Thanksgiving. This year, they gave the Thanksgiving eve slot to the third part of Lego Yoda Chronicles specials, Attack of the Jedi. Must be nice for Disney to have one of their biggest competitors choose a toyetic version of one of their biggest acquisitions in such a prime slot instead of a Powerpuff Girls special that reunites the cast in a new adventure. 
  3. Or they could have picked an arbitrary date across the year. Green Lantern’s first two episodes premiered on November 11, 2011 (11/11/11). Re-Animated debuted on December 8, 2006. No special significance at all. A Ben 10 animated special, the computer-animated Destroy All Aliens, debuted on March 24, 2012. 

The sad part is that Cartoon Network had a legitimate reason to air it in 2013 and didn’t choose to do it. And that reason was The Powerpuff Girls premiered 15 years ago on November 18, 1998. Guess what day that occurred this year? Monday. You know what aired that Monday? 

An unfinished episode of Regular Show. Regular Show made the top of the worldwide trends on Twitter for the wrong reasons (people complained about the harsh colors, jagged character outlines, and weird backgrounds, even creator J.G. Quintel complained about what went wrong), and that was quite unfortunate. It was a pretty good episode. Still, at least for that night, Cartoon Network could have adjusted the lineup and aired the Powerpuff Girls special that night easily:

  • 7 PM: Adventure Time
  • 7:15 PM: Steven Universe
  • 7:30 PM: The Powerpuff Girls Special: 
  • 8:30 PM: Regular Show
  • 8:45 PM: MAD

Note, I don’t know how long the special is, but I’m putting it on for an hour for the safe side, but that’s a completely respectable lineup, and it’s probably not all that different from what they’ll do on January 20, 2014 when it does air.

This isn’t the first time a Powerpuff Girls anniversary special was scheduled after the actual anniversary. The Powerpuff Girls Rule! debuted on November 21, 2008 in the Asian and European markets, a few days after the anniversary. It made its American debut months later on January 19, 2009, so the American debut of both anniversary specials are five years and a day apart. Maybe this was the plan all along, but still, one can’t help to ignore the fact that Cartoon Network had many opportunities to air the special throughout the year and only announced it within hours after a major children’s entertainment producer more or less proclaimed the network were borderline misogynists. 

That’s a heck of a coincidence, but sometimes a hat is just a hat.

blackcatula

blackcatula:

You know what really wraps the whole package though? I just realized that Cartoon Network even has a flagship show that personifies this entire misogynistic clusterfuck they’ve painted themselves into: Regular Show.

While Regular Show is a pretty great show that’s overall entertaining, it is 100% geared toward college boys. It’s about bros and the culture they live together, and yeah, there are a couple of female characters, but the moment you start to develop them, they need to get subtly written off the show so you can keep the focus on the “goofy boys humor” with pizza and farts and pranks and no homo yo bro.

Again, I really love how pro-artistic freedom CN can be, and they’ve really put out some AMAZING shows this decade, but I’m getting more than a little fed up with this nonsense. I can only pray they don’t pull the plug on Steven Universe now, since that show is - in a nutshell - the antithesis of CN’s bro-fist philosophy.

You’re no longer my #1 favorite network, CN. Not anymore….

Well said. 

I still like some parts of Cartoon Network (mostly that six-hour action block that airs on Saturday nights on their Adult Swim side), but yeah, their shunning of action and embrace of that whole dudebro he-man woman-haters mentality is pretty weak, and yeah, Regular Show is emblematic of that mentality. They did write off Margaret just as she and Mordecai were finally getting together. 

I’d think networks would want audiences no matter the gender. I mean, if you’re watching the network, you’re helping the network. Guess not. You’re over the age of 12, Cartoon Network doesn’t want your viewership. You’re a young teen, Cartoon Network doesn’t want your viewership. You’re a girl, Cartoon Network doesn’t want your viewership.

Pretty narrow market considering the majority of potential viewers aren’t young boys between the ages of 6 and 12 and 9 and 14. They grow up so fast.