giancarlovolpe

giancarlovolpe:

A little behind the scenes look of the early stages of Green Lantern the Animated Series.

My eternal gratitude to everyone who helped prove the doubters wrong.

Wow.

It seemed like the datacrunchers were only concerned with making something just for tween boys, who just won’t into it. Girls LOVED it, young boys did too.

The bottom line: focus groups are stupid.

Let the viewers judge themselves.

Not so much eye-opening, but rather a visualization of what I’ve imagined these situations were like.

Not A Fan of the Comcast/Time Warner Cable Merger

By this time next year, the Time Warner name will be gone. The entertainment company that has that name is spinning off the publication units of Time, Inc into its own company while the Warner media and content divisions remain its own unit. It’s likely they’ll use Warner in the umbrella brand name and drop the Time because it’s inevitable. Let’s face it, they don’t call the company AOL Time Warner either, especially after AOL was spun off.

Also, the cable service provider Time Warner Cable will also be a thing of the past when the Comcast deal goes through and the two biggest cable providers become one monopolistic entity demon covering top markets across the country, including the Top 5 media markets.

And yes, it is a monopoly. 

Don’t let the media tell you any differently, the cable industry is largely a monopolistic industry. When you only have one choice of a service, that’s a monopoly.

The Comcast customers won’t see anything different, but Time Warner Cable customers will lose so much and will likely be swallowed up by the Comcast culture

"B-b-but you can get satellite services like DirecTV or fiber-optic services like Verizon FIOS or AT&T U-Verse." 

Not always. Most communities only have one cable provider, and smaller companies have no chance of entering the market. Most apartment buildings don’t allow satellite service and only has one company they deal with, which is usually the cable company. For example, I live in an apartment. I can’t get any of the satellite companies and I can’t get FIOS, but I can get Cox here.

The smaller industry means the big boys make the rules and set the prices. Cable prices are already astronomical and are only going to get higher without significant changes in programming, quality, and actual variety. You’ll see more and more clashes between Comcast and the companies that own cable networks like Disney, Discovery, Viacom, CBS, 21st Century Fox, AMC Networks, and the OTHER company that’s still called Time Warner. You know, the one that owns the Turner channels and HBO? Prepare for huge fights that could black out channels nationwide. Larger footprint, bigger impact.

Oh … you might be one of those “cord-cutters” the news media loves to slobber over. You brave souls that bucked “the system” by “dropping cable” and only going through broadband for your entertainment needs.

Think you’re immune?

Think again.

Cable companies have been struggling about what to do about “cord-cutters,” and that only took about a second before they figured out what to do: raise prices and limit access. The American broadband market, which has speeds slower than many other industrialized countries and costs 100% more than in other countries. Prices are getting higher at a faster rate than the speeds they can go. And if you think because you don’t “watch TV” you won’t be affected? That’s foolish thinking.

You’ve heard a lot about net neutrality in the news recently. In case you’ve been living under a rock, net neutrality is the  is the principle that ISPs and governments should “treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging deferentially by user, content, site, platform, application, type of attached equipment, and modes of communication.” In short, the Interest should remain as is. Big broadband companies and media corporations have been publicly against it by stating publicly they’d never limit access to anything online nor slow you down.

That has been disproven many times over, and most times, the culprit was Comcast. All the major cable companies are against net neutrality, including Time Warner Cable and Comcast. They’ll be in a bigger position to limit access to certain sites, apps, and anything they happen to disagree with. If greed clouds their mind, they could even block access to entertainment sites owned by outside companies like, say, YouTube or Netflix. 

Not saying they would, but given the fact that the federal courts recently gave them leeway to do so, they legally could now. 

So, what can we do about it?

Admittedly not much, sad to say. The weak-kneed division in charge of business mergers like this tend to let oligarchies and monopolies go through with no worries, and this is still the case.

But there are so many people against the Comcast/Time Warner Cable merger. Diverse voices that normally wouldn’t get along are opposed to this merger. 

If you’re against it as much as I am, contribute your voice to the cause and join us

ami-angelwings

ami-angelwings:

I was just at Wal-Mart and I noticed this.  It’s not just the default pink for girls thing, or the default skirt for girls, or how this costume looks nothing like Spider-Girl’s costume, but that this is an official Marvel product and they have the comic heroine on the front so you can see just how wrong it is.

Like, if your child likes Spider-Girl and wants to dress up as her, wouldn’t they be really disappointed at this costume?  And if they don’t care about looking like Spider-Girl, what’s even the point of having this costume under the Spider-Girl brand with the heroine right on the front to sell it? o_O

Just for reference, here’s the Spider-Man outfit:

WTF!?  It’s not a generic blue prince costume with some web-lines, an eye mask and a tie?  B… but how would you know it was a Spider-MAN otherwise?

Seriously … the company used the ACTUAL SPIDER-GIRL COSTUME ON THE COVER and still made a frilly, pink number they call “Spider-Girl.” 

Stupid people.

Twenty-eight years ago today (April 23), Coca-Cola reintroduced their marquee beverage with a new formula and a bold name, Coke. 
It was much ballyhooed and liked by a few.
Of course, it was hated by so many folks who preferred the original formula, and by July 10, 1985, Coke reversed itself and brought back “the real thing,” or at least a version of it sweetened with HFCS rather than cane sugar that they called Coca-Cola Classic.
Was it a publicity stunt to get people to be up in arms with them to bring back something they were already planning to do? Snopes says nope, but who’s to say what really happened that day?
Truth be told, I kind of liked New Coke. Kind of reminded me of Royal Crown Cola. dry but sweet, not syrupy sweet. Pity they’ll never bottle it again. People actually did buy it.
Hail to New Coke, and happy 28th birthday!

Twenty-eight years ago today (April 23), Coca-Cola reintroduced their marquee beverage with a new formula and a bold name, Coke. 

It was much ballyhooed and liked by a few.

Of course, it was hated by so many folks who preferred the original formula, and by July 10, 1985, Coke reversed itself and brought back “the real thing,” or at least a version of it sweetened with HFCS rather than cane sugar that they called Coca-Cola Classic.

Was it a publicity stunt to get people to be up in arms with them to bring back something they were already planning to do? Snopes says nope, but who’s to say what really happened that day?

Truth be told, I kind of liked New Coke. Kind of reminded me of Royal Crown Cola. dry but sweet, not syrupy sweet. Pity they’ll never bottle it again. People actually did buy it.

Hail to New Coke, and happy 28th birthday!

I’m not a profane man.
I don’t use profanity as much as my peers. It’s already hard enough to be a POC in America trying not to give off the whole “angry Black man” stereotype.
I’m calm. I’m a lot calmer than I should be, and at times, it frightens me.
That aside, there was a great line in Risky Business:
"Sometimes you have to say, "What the fuck!""
In regards to this actual product, I feel the need to repeat those last three words (forgive me in advanced for this outburst of profanity) to Adidas, the makers of this abomination pictured here that is actually a real thing:
WHAT THE FUCK?!?
*sigh*

I’m not a profane man.

I don’t use profanity as much as my peers. It’s already hard enough to be a POC in America trying not to give off the whole “angry Black man” stereotype.

I’m calm. I’m a lot calmer than I should be, and at times, it frightens me.

That aside, there was a great line in Risky Business:

"Sometimes you have to say, "What the fuck!""

In regards to this actual product, I feel the need to repeat those last three words (forgive me in advanced for this outburst of profanity) to Adidas, the makers of this abomination pictured here that is actually a real thing:

WHAT THE FUCK?!?

*sigh*

Seriously, What The Hell, Paramount?

You know that GI Joe sequel that not only looks amazing but twenty-times better than the original film that was supposed to be coming out next month?

Paramount said wait a while longer. Like March 2013.

Yup. The studio’s delaying the premiere almost a whole year to “have an international push and 3D conversion.”

Studiospeak for “we’re scared of The Avengers, Batman, and Spider-Man”

Say Kids…

Did you know ThunderCats returns to Cartoon Network on Marc h 24 at 9:30 AM E/P, two weeks from today?

Did you know a day earlier, Cartoon Network is premiering a new computer-animated Ben 10 movie at 7 PM E/P and part one of the Ben 10 Ultimate Alien series finale at 9 AM E/P?

Of course you didn’t.

Cartoon Network only promotes Level Up, Ninjago, Green Lantern, and the bullying special.

Idiots like me only promote things because Cartoon Network knows idiots like me could do it for nothing. But like I said, the internet shouldn’t be the sole advertising vessel for people who own television networks.

Explaining The Ratings System

drawology replied to your post: How About That?
i have no clue what those numbers mean, i see 2.something/10 and i’m thinking that’s the score they gave it out of 10. but if you say its a good thing then I trust you

The Nielsen ratings, the criteria of how well something’s doing. It’s not a system out of 10, mind you. Each ratings point represents 1% of a particular television audience, in this case, children 6-11.

So, let’s say, for example, about 290 million television viewers in the United States. Out of that, let’s say that less than a quarter of that number has children 2-17. That’s about 57 million homes. Now, take about less than half of that for a representation of the 6-11 demographic. That’s a touch over 21 million viewers.

Each ratings point for the 6-11 audience represents  about 1% of the 21 million viewers that age, so, about 210,000. viewers.

And less than 1% of the 290 million total viewers are even participating in the Nielsen ratings system.

Using what we know, Green Lantern got a 2.1 while Young Justice got a 2.2, meaning of all the shows that was on TV at that moment, 2.1% of kids 6-11 was watching GL and 2.2% of the same demographic watched YJ.

That roughly translates to Green Lantern getting about 441,000 viewers 6-11 for Green Lantern and 462,000 viewers 6-11 for Young Justice.

Is it a low number? If you’re just measuring that one demo, it’s anemic yet a comfortable success. The numbers are slightly better on Saturday mornings than they were on Friday nights. However, it’s just the numbers for only one demographic. The hard number is usually bigger, almost double that for total viewers.Something like Spongebob, which got a 5.5 in the 6-11 demographic, could have close to 2 million viewers if you count all the demographics.  

The ratings that are made public usually depend on the demographic the network selling ad space to, or in Disney Channel’s reasoning, cable companies who keep it on the lineup.

Also, not everybody is always counted in the end. Remember, only 1% of the audience is represented by the Nielsens, and it tends to favor affluent, White upper-middle-class households. I’m of the belief that one household represents the viewpoint of one household, not 1% of the entire television audience, but until the system is changed, this is what we have.

And so far, in this case, it’s pretty good.