tombancroft1

tombancroft1:

To all the Venture Capitalists, App developer company Presidents, Animation Studio heads, Book publishers, Comic Company CEOs, and other media giants: I CAN GUARANTEE your next kid’s entertainment project will be a success! (You’re listening now, right?)

Okay. Drumroll please….Here’s the secret:…

Seriously, go to that link!

Read. 

The line that hit me the most is “those creatives ARE YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE” because it’s true. Creative folks make things THEY want to see. If we’re entertained, the crowds will dig it too. 

Actually, that’s one of many lines that hit me the most. Unfortunately, media types don’t pay attention to articles like these which is why they’re still asking the question “what do kids like?” all these years.

And that’s the problem. 

Read the article now. 

Tom Bancroft gets “the big idea.”

radiospringy

crackmccraigen:

Part 2 of “Toys that Never Were!” THE BLOO SUPERDUDE! 

Back when we were developing Foster’s toys I was in a meeting with our manufacturer to brainstorm ideas for what would make a great Bloo toy. After some frustrating back and fourth on the difficulty of making toys for comedy cartoons, I suggested that if Bloo was sitting in this meeting he would have no problem coming up with what would make a great toy of him…  

HE WOULD WANT THE MOST EXTREME TOY EVER MADE!!!

So I developed Bloo’s heroic fantasy version of himself: The Bloo Superdude! My thought was that you could make a toy for a comedy by making a comedic toy! I thought it would be funny to turn Bloo into one of the most absurdly stupid (but awesome) action figures ever! Just make him a pumped up warrior/robot/superhero/rock-star with tons of useless (but awesome) gadgets, weapons, and accessories! 

Each Superdude set would come with a basic removable Bloo figure (each with a different expression) and one of the members of the Foster’s gang.

So the Superdude would come with a Mac, his jetpack could come with an Eduardo, additional weapons for his robo-arm could include a Coco, and his chopper came with a bendy Wilt.

That way, if you collected all the sets you would not only have all this Superdude stuff, but you would also have the basic Foster’s gang as well!   

Cartoon Network and I loved this idea so much, that in an attempt to convince our manufacturer to make The Superdude, I made a couple of cartoons with him in it and CN made the amazing prototype pictured here.

Despite our best efforts, it didn’t happen. But at least CN was nice enough to let me have the prototype as proof of how absurdly stupid (but awesome) this toy could have been.

We could have had it all!

Genius at work here. 

That’s the problem with a lot of modern toys, I guess … they aren’t as fun as this looks. 

It’s a parody of an action figure, and I love it!

But alas, Cartoon Network and their infinite wisdom … 

jhenne-bean

kxsxy:

kxsxy:

Pro Tip: Don’t torrent Alice In Chains because they’ll fucking know you did.

Update: they’re still coming .  
One notice per song multiplied by Alice In Chains’ entire discography equals ComCast switching to automated colorless letters because we’re costing them more in labor and supplies than we’re worth.

Remember when I said content owners were becoming more litigious about the theft of their property through torrents and illegal downloading and going directly to the consumer?

I wasn’t kidding.  

mmanalysis

mmanalysis:

thoughtnami, This seems like something up your alley. 

I get what Mr. Auletta’s saying and agree that something’s going to give for traditional commercial television to stay around. 

I think the average joe that hates commercials so much doesn’t get that those commercials are the reason you can watch them for “free.” Without ads, you’re moving to a pay-television model throughout all of television, and I guess people with disposable income are fine with that. 

The fact that you can buy episodes of a series that aired free-of-charge over-the-air the next day is a strange concept on its own. And these kids who love to proclaim that television should just die would rather pay to watch these shows than endure four 4-minute commercial breaks per hour (oh, the horror). 

These kids (and yeah, if you’re old enough to drink alcohol but live at with able-bodied parents who could take care of themselves at their home, you’re a kid) who whine that they don’t need ad-supported television are more than happy to pay for a handful of services like CrunchyRoll, Hulu Plus, Netflix, and Amazon Prime.

(And a lot of them actually steal these shows through various means, but I don’t like to talk about that here)

However, every economist knows that the prices are going to rise in time thanks to the increase demand of these services. Amazon Prime is now $99, and Netflix and Hulu Plus are planning to offer premium tiers with raised prices as well. 

Oh, and broadband rates are going up too thanks to decreased competition and limited market share (it’s Comcastic!). And the companies that rely on broadband access (which is everybody) are going to have to pay fees to these big broadband companies just to reach you, the audience. Netflix is already paying Comcast an access fee, and they’ll likely push that cost to consumers as well. And just because you don’t have Comcast doesn’t mean the other cable/broadband companies aren’t planning to do the same thing to other services.  

But BOO! commercials, right?

Worse case scenario, every scripted project will have some product placement in lieu of actual commercials. People walking around talking on their Samsung Galaxy or Apple iPhones. Somebody driving a new model Volkswagen Beetle into a McDonald’s billboard. Friends reminding other friends who are moving to make sure they have a DirecTV subscription so they won’t miss their favorite soap which is moving there. A group of students trying to prevent a group of greedy businessmen from turning their beloved community college to a Subway restaurant university.  

Ah, product placement.

But BOO! commercials, right?

The fact is commercials aren’t going anywhere, and neither is commercial television. Operators and services are limiting ad-blocking programs and restricting DVR controls people use to bypass commercials. Oh, and big companies are monitoring torrents out there and content owners are becoming litigious on the consumer level. They’ve already attacked and shut down major torrent outlets, so you’re next on the hit list. Mommy and daddy can’t get you out of that one. 

I’ve seen too many people dismiss Mr. Auletta as an old man with no idea what he’s talking about, but he gets it. He’s been getting it longer than a lot of these kids have been alive. Mr. Auletta saw the potential for the internet as an entertainment vessel while it was still connected by phone lines and the downfall of the broadcast model while Cosby was still king and cable was an afterthought. He knows what he’s talking about and is wondering out loud what’s next in the decades ahead rather than the immediate future. 

He gets it. 

giancarlovolpe

giancarlovolpe:

A little behind the scenes look of the early stages of Green Lantern the Animated Series.

My eternal gratitude to everyone who helped prove the doubters wrong.

Wow.

It seemed like the datacrunchers were only concerned with making something just for tween boys, who just won’t into it. Girls LOVED it, young boys did too.

The bottom line: focus groups are stupid.

Let the viewers judge themselves.

Not so much eye-opening, but rather a visualization of what I’ve imagined these situations were like.

Not A Fan of the Comcast/Time Warner Cable Merger

By this time next year, the Time Warner name will be gone. The entertainment company that has that name is spinning off the publication units of Time, Inc into its own company while the Warner media and content divisions remain its own unit. It’s likely they’ll use Warner in the umbrella brand name and drop the Time because it’s inevitable. Let’s face it, they don’t call the company AOL Time Warner either, especially after AOL was spun off.

Also, the cable service provider Time Warner Cable will also be a thing of the past when the Comcast deal goes through and the two biggest cable providers become one monopolistic entity demon covering top markets across the country, including the Top 5 media markets.

And yes, it is a monopoly. 

Don’t let the media tell you any differently, the cable industry is largely a monopolistic industry. When you only have one choice of a service, that’s a monopoly.

The Comcast customers won’t see anything different, but Time Warner Cable customers will lose so much and will likely be swallowed up by the Comcast culture

"B-b-but you can get satellite services like DirecTV or fiber-optic services like Verizon FIOS or AT&T U-Verse." 

Not always. Most communities only have one cable provider, and smaller companies have no chance of entering the market. Most apartment buildings don’t allow satellite service and only has one company they deal with, which is usually the cable company. For example, I live in an apartment. I can’t get any of the satellite companies and I can’t get FIOS, but I can get Cox here.

The smaller industry means the big boys make the rules and set the prices. Cable prices are already astronomical and are only going to get higher without significant changes in programming, quality, and actual variety. You’ll see more and more clashes between Comcast and the companies that own cable networks like Disney, Discovery, Viacom, CBS, 21st Century Fox, AMC Networks, and the OTHER company that’s still called Time Warner. You know, the one that owns the Turner channels and HBO? Prepare for huge fights that could black out channels nationwide. Larger footprint, bigger impact.

Oh … you might be one of those “cord-cutters” the news media loves to slobber over. You brave souls that bucked “the system” by “dropping cable” and only going through broadband for your entertainment needs.

Think you’re immune?

Think again.

Cable companies have been struggling about what to do about “cord-cutters,” and that only took about a second before they figured out what to do: raise prices and limit access. The American broadband market, which has speeds slower than many other industrialized countries and costs 100% more than in other countries. Prices are getting higher at a faster rate than the speeds they can go. And if you think because you don’t “watch TV” you won’t be affected? That’s foolish thinking.

You’ve heard a lot about net neutrality in the news recently. In case you’ve been living under a rock, net neutrality is the  is the principle that ISPs and governments should “treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging deferentially by user, content, site, platform, application, type of attached equipment, and modes of communication.” In short, the Interest should remain as is. Big broadband companies and media corporations have been publicly against it by stating publicly they’d never limit access to anything online nor slow you down.

That has been disproven many times over, and most times, the culprit was Comcast. All the major cable companies are against net neutrality, including Time Warner Cable and Comcast. They’ll be in a bigger position to limit access to certain sites, apps, and anything they happen to disagree with. If greed clouds their mind, they could even block access to entertainment sites owned by outside companies like, say, YouTube or Netflix. 

Not saying they would, but given the fact that the federal courts recently gave them leeway to do so, they legally could now. 

So, what can we do about it?

Admittedly not much, sad to say. The weak-kneed division in charge of business mergers like this tend to let oligarchies and monopolies go through with no worries, and this is still the case.

But there are so many people against the Comcast/Time Warner Cable merger. Diverse voices that normally wouldn’t get along are opposed to this merger. 

If you’re against it as much as I am, contribute your voice to the cause and join us

ami-angelwings

ami-angelwings:

I was just at Wal-Mart and I noticed this.  It’s not just the default pink for girls thing, or the default skirt for girls, or how this costume looks nothing like Spider-Girl’s costume, but that this is an official Marvel product and they have the comic heroine on the front so you can see just how wrong it is.

Like, if your child likes Spider-Girl and wants to dress up as her, wouldn’t they be really disappointed at this costume?  And if they don’t care about looking like Spider-Girl, what’s even the point of having this costume under the Spider-Girl brand with the heroine right on the front to sell it? o_O

Just for reference, here’s the Spider-Man outfit:

WTF!?  It’s not a generic blue prince costume with some web-lines, an eye mask and a tie?  B… but how would you know it was a Spider-MAN otherwise?

Seriously … the company used the ACTUAL SPIDER-GIRL COSTUME ON THE COVER and still made a frilly, pink number they call “Spider-Girl.” 

Stupid people.

Twenty-eight years ago today (April 23), Coca-Cola reintroduced their marquee beverage with a new formula and a bold name, Coke. 
It was much ballyhooed and liked by a few.
Of course, it was hated by so many folks who preferred the original formula, and by July 10, 1985, Coke reversed itself and brought back “the real thing,” or at least a version of it sweetened with HFCS rather than cane sugar that they called Coca-Cola Classic.
Was it a publicity stunt to get people to be up in arms with them to bring back something they were already planning to do? Snopes says nope, but who’s to say what really happened that day?
Truth be told, I kind of liked New Coke. Kind of reminded me of Royal Crown Cola. dry but sweet, not syrupy sweet. Pity they’ll never bottle it again. People actually did buy it.
Hail to New Coke, and happy 28th birthday!

Twenty-eight years ago today (April 23), Coca-Cola reintroduced their marquee beverage with a new formula and a bold name, Coke. 

It was much ballyhooed and liked by a few.

Of course, it was hated by so many folks who preferred the original formula, and by July 10, 1985, Coke reversed itself and brought back “the real thing,” or at least a version of it sweetened with HFCS rather than cane sugar that they called Coca-Cola Classic.

Was it a publicity stunt to get people to be up in arms with them to bring back something they were already planning to do? Snopes says nope, but who’s to say what really happened that day?

Truth be told, I kind of liked New Coke. Kind of reminded me of Royal Crown Cola. dry but sweet, not syrupy sweet. Pity they’ll never bottle it again. People actually did buy it.

Hail to New Coke, and happy 28th birthday!